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Social Psychology Colloquium: New Series


<Colloquium in Academic Year 2017: Upcoming>

<Colloquium in Academic Year 2017: Finished>

Prosocial behavior in young infants and adults: Fairness, helping and sympathy"

Date:July 21, 2017  15:00~16:30
Place:Faculty of Law and Letters Bldg 2, The Teacher's Lounge (2nd Floor)

Speaker Shoji Itakura (Professor, Kyoto University)
Title Prosocial behavior in young infants and adults: Fairness, helping and sympathy
Abstract The early development of prosocial behavior has become an important topic in developmental psychology. In my talk, I will report our original studies concern to this topic.
1) Fairness in infants: The present study investigated whether 15-month-olds react differently to events that instantiate fair and unfair distribution of resources performed by agents that have previously performed a helping or hindering action towards a third party.
2) Empathy of infants: We show that preverbal 10-month-olds manifest sympathetic responses, evinced in their preference for attacked others according to their evaluations of the respective roles of victim, aggressor, and neutral party. These findings indicate that 10-month-olds not only evaluate the roles of victims and aggressors in interactions but also show rudimentary sympathy toward others in distress based on that evaluation.
3) Understanding of need in infants and prosocial behavior: Here we show that infants understand others’ needs already in the first year and, furthermore, that this understanding translates into helpful action at the beginning of the second year, given sufficient motor abilities and skills for social engagement. This is shown by the close link between infants’ understanding of others’ needs and their helping behavior. Importantly, this link is established by their fine motor abilities and their social engagement that both moderate this effect. Furthermore, infants’ fine and gross motor abilities as well as their social engagement with the experimenter were closely related to infants’ helping behavior.
     

Caretakers' Legal Liability for Accidents Caused by Elderly Dementia Patients: Social Impacts of Court Judgments and ADR Decisions”

Date:June 1, 2017  16:00~17:30
Place:Faculty of Law and Letters Bldg 2, The Teacher's Lounge (2nd Floor)

Speaker Shozo Ota (Professor, The University of Tokyo)
Title Caretakers' Legal Liability for Accidents Caused by Elderly Dementia Patients: Social Impacts of Court Judgments and ADR Decisions
     


<Colloquium in Academic Year 2016>

Hongo-Komaba Joint Seminar”

Date:November 25, 2016  13:00~17:45
Place:Faculty of Law and Letters Bldg 2, The Teacher's Lounge (2nd Floor)

Title Hongo-Komaba Joint Seminar
Outline The Department of Cognitive and Behavioral Science (Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo) and the Department of Social Psychology (Graduate School of Humanities and Sociology, The University of Tokyo) jointly held a seminar. The seminar consisted of oral and poster presentations by emerging scholars from the two departments, showcasing their cutting-edge research. We expect the seminar to be a venue for rich and rigorous discussions with insights into further interdisciplinary research and collaboration.
       
       

Field Experiments Revolution in Development Economics”

Date:June 24, 2016  15:00~16:30
Place:Faculty of Law and Letters Bldg 2, The Teacher's Lounge (2nd Floor)

Speaker Yasuyuki Sawada (Professor, The University of Tokyo)
Title Field Experiments Revolution in Development Economics
Abstract In the last fifteen years, development economics, a sub-field in economics to study both positive and normative aspects of developing economies, transformed itself from the bottom to the top fields in economics. In my talk, I will review the core ingredients of this "revolution," i.e., development policy evaluation based on randomized controlled trials and laboratory experiments in the field. Then, I will share findings from my recent field experiments on rice planting in the Philippines and a primary education decentralization project in Burkina Faso.
     

Social endocrinology”

Date:April 22, 2016  15:00~16:30
Place:Faculty of Law and Letters Bldg 2, The Teacher's Lounge (2nd Floor)

Speaker Takefumi Kikusui (Professor, Azabu University)
Title Social endocrinology
     

<Colloquium in Academic Year 2015>

Opposing effects of emotional arousal on cognitive processing: When does emotional arousal facilitate and when does it impair cognitive processing?"

Date:February 9, 2016  15:00~16:30
Place:Faculty of Law and Letters Bldg 2, Lecture Hall No.2 (2nd Floor)

Speaker Michiko Sakaki (Senior Research Fellow, University of Reading)
Title Opposing effects of emotional arousal on cognitive processing: When does emotional arousal facilitate and when does it impair cognitive processing?
     

Implicit behavioral contagion: minimalist approach versus inclusive approach”

Date:December 4, 2015  15:00~16:30
Place:Faculty of Law and Letters Bldg 2, The Teacher's Lounge (2nd Floor)

Speaker Katsumi Watanabe (Professor, Waseda University)
Title Implicit behavioral contagion: minimalist approach versus inclusive approach
     

Two neural circuits concerning generation of values and social judgments”

Date:October 16, 2015  16:00~17:30
Place:Faculty of Law and Letters Bldg 2, The Teacher's Lounge (2nd Floor)

Speaker Masamichi Sakagami (Professor, Brain Science Institute, Tamagawa University)
Title Two neural circuits concerning generation of values and social judgments
     

The Psychosocial Basis of Ritual Behavior”

Date:July 17, 2015  14:00~15:30
Place:Faculty of Law and Letters Bldg 2, The Teacher's Lounge (2nd Floor)

Speaker Christopher Kavanagh (Ph.D. candidate, Institute of Cognitive & Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Oxford)
Title Extreme rituals: The cognitive and social consequences of extreme ritual events:
Abstract Ritual behaviour has long been a topic of interest amongst social scientists and anthropologists in particular. However, over the past decade there has been a flurry of new research by cognitive anthropologists and psychologists that has set out to examine more precisely the cognitive effects of observing and participating in collective ritual events using novel quantitative methods. In particular, new theories have emerged concerning extreme rituals and their ability to serve as a costly signal of commitment to a group and act as a ‘social glue’ generating intense relational bonds amongst participants. This talk summarises the major new cognitive theories of ritual and discusses the evidence for their role as social technologies for bonding and reinforcing group identity. New results from the large, international ‘Ritual, Community & Conflict’ project led by researchers at Oxford University are discussed along with recent evidence collected by the author from a variety of fire walking and cold water immersion ritual events held across Japan.
     

Cognitive and Physiological Bases of Group Life: Sociality of Crows and Sociality of Primates”

Date:May 8, 2015  14:30~18:00
Place:Faculty of Law and Letters Bldg 2, The Teacher's Lounge (2nd Floor)

Speaker Ei-Ichi Izawa (Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, Keio University)
Title Cognition, social ecology, and brain/body design of crows
Speaker Kenji Onishi(Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, JSPS)
Title Genetic, hormonal, and social factors affecting sociality in primates.
     


<Colloquium in Academic Year 2014>

“Thinking about the Relations between Culture, Society and Gene (2)”

Date:March 6, 2015  13:00~18:00
Place:Faculty of Law and Letters Bldg 2, The Teacher's Lounge (2nd Floor)

Speaker Masahiro Tsujimoto(Associate Professor, Graduate School of Arts and Letters, Tohoku University)
Title Life history of the Japanese in Argentina
Speaker Keiko Ishii(Associate Professor, Faculty of Letters, Kobe University)
Title Cultural neuroscience: Recent findings and the implications
Speaker Hiroshi Shimizu(Assistant Professor, Graduate School of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University)
Title A theoretical approach to the origin of morality: The dynamic interdependence theory and the institutional analysis

 


“Thinking about the Relations between Culture, Society and Gene (1)”

Date: February 12, 2015 15:00〜18:00
Place: Faculty of Law and Letters Bldg 2, The Teacher's Lounge (2nd Floor)

Speaker Shinji Yamagata (Associate Professor, Faculty of Arts and Science, Kyushu University)
Title Human behavior genetics: Methodology and its application to social sciences
Abstract Human behavior genetics (HBG) provides methodology to differentiate between genetic and environmental influences that are otherwise confounded. In this presentation, three methods in HBG are explained: (1) univariate genetic analysis (i.e. estimation of heritability), (2) multivariate genetic analysis (i.e. decomposition of covariance between traits into genetic and environmental sources), (3) analysis of gene-environment interaction (i.e. differential effects of genes by environment). Major findings in HBG using the three methods are reviewed. Also, usefulness of applying HBG to research in social sciences are discussed.
Speaker Motoko Harihara (Instructor, School of Arts and Sciences, Tokyo Women's Christian University)
Title Cultural differences in attitudes toward others and social network structure between Japanese, Korea, and the United States

        


<Previous Colloquium>